Is Depression Passed Down Through Family?

Is Depression Passed Down Through Family?

Major depressive disorder is one of the most commonly diagnosed mental illnesses in the United States. According to data from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 7.8%, or 19.4 million adults in the United States, have had at least one major depressive episode in the past year. About 5.3% of adults, or 13.1 million people, have had at least one major depressive episode that has caused severe impairment in the last year. Major depression can make daily life tasks and getting along with other people difficult. 

What Does Depression Look Like?

Common signs of depression include the following: 

  • Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless most days 
  • Feeling a loss of pleasure or interest in doing things that you once enjoyed
  • Fatigue and loss of overall energy
  • Changes in sleep, such as insomnia (not being able to sleep) or hypersomnia (sleeping too much)
  • Changes in appetite, such as eating too much or eating too little 
  • Difficulty concentrating or indecisiveness 
  • Feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate and excessive guilt  
  • Recurrent thoughts of death

Depression is more than just an intense feeling of sadness. Depression is classified as having multiple symptoms for 2 weeks or longer. Typically, symptoms last many months and, for some people, years. Each person will experience depression differently, as well. For example, one individual may not have the feelings of being down, depressed, or hopeless, but they may notice a loss of pleasure or interest in doing things as well as other symptoms. This is still classified as depression, but notably experienced differently. 

The symptoms together can affect day-to-day tasks and activities. For example, some people experiencing depression may neglect their hygiene or household chores more often. They may also notice decreased performance at work or school, likely because they have a lack of drive or feel fatigued due to the depressive symptoms. Individuals also often notice their interpersonal relationships being impacted either because they are isolating themselves because they’re not interested in activities, or because they are irritable and having difficulty getting along with others. People with depression may also frequently seem “out of it” or “spacey” because of lack of sleep, low energy, and having difficulty concentrating. 

What are the Causes of Depression?

There are many different things that can contribute to someone developing depression. Factors that can contribute to depression can be biological, psychological, and/or environmental. Some factors that have been associated with increased risk of depression include the following: 

  • A chemical imbalance in the brain. Serotonin is a chemical in the brain that is associated with depression. When the brain is not using enough serotonin, it can cause increased levels of depression. This is why SSRI’s (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) are used to treat depression. They cause the brain to use more serotonin, which can relieve depressive symptoms for many people. 
  • Genetics. Depression can have a genetic factor. If a family member has depression, it does not mean that you will automatically develop it late in life too. Rather, it means that you may be more vulnerable to developing depression at some point in your life because you are genetically predisposed to it. 
  • Stressful life events. Stressful events such as the loss of a loved one, family discord, heartbreak, loss of friendships, health issues, and more can also cause depression. 
  • Maladaptive thought patterns. People who have negative thought patterns, are self-critical, and have low self-esteem are more likely to develop depression. 
  • Using alcohol and drugs. While people sometimes claim that using certain drugs or alcohol helps them relax and calm down, it actually, over time, can increase levels of depression in many people who abuse drugs. 
  • Loneliness. Feelings of loneliness can increase the risk of developing depression. 

How to Find Depression Treatment Centers

Thrive Treatment offers comprehensive services to clients experiencing mental health or substance use concerns. We have expert clinicians available that provide case management services, individual therapy, group therapy, and incorporation of family support. Each client has an individualized treatment plan unique to their recovery. We offer different levels of care, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, sober living houses, and aftercare. Contact us today to find out how we can help you through your recovery!

Is Adderall Addictive?

Is Adderall Addictive?

Adderall is a stimulant drug that many people find helpful when it is prescribed to them for ADHD. However, it is commonly abused, especially by teenagers and college students. Because of this, it is also sold illegally on the streets for people that are unable to get a prescription from a doctor. People abusing Adderall often have the illusion that things are going very well with the help of Adderall. This, coupled with difficult withdrawal symptoms when use is stopped, causes people to delay finding help for their Adderall addiction. Thrive Treatment helps provide education about Adderal abuse, addiction, and treatment. 

What is Adderall?

Adderall is a stimulant drug that is often legally prescribed to treat individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Adderall is an amphetamine-type stimulant medication. When people with ADHD use this substance, it helps reduce inattentive and hyperactive symptoms and improve overall day-to-day functioning. However, when abused by people without ADHD, it tends to have the opposite effect and makes people have hyperactivity and increased energy. People often abuse it with the idea that it will help them focus and be more productive. Because of this misunderstanding of how Adderall works, students on college campuses often abuse it. However, Adderall abuse by people without ADHD is associated with many negative consequences despite the illusion to those abusing it that things are going well. 

How is Adderall Used?

Adderall comes in the form of a pill, so it is recommended that it is taken orally and swallowed. It is also commonly crushed up and snorted when people are abusing it. When used as prescribed, it is taken daily to improve hyperactive and inattentive symptoms. However, those abusing it recreationally tend to use it to help them complete work, schoolwork, chores, or other productive goals. 

How Addictive Is Adderall?

Adderall is an amphetamine-type medication that is highly addictive. Individuals that abuse Adderall can quickly build a tolerance for the medication. If they stop use of it, then they may experience withdrawal symptoms that can be very uncomfortable, which often causes people to relapse to avoid these symptoms. Signs of addiction include the following: 

  • Building up a tolerance and needing more Adderall or more frequent doses to get the same effect 
  • Withdrawal symptoms. For Adderall, this includes increased anxiety, depression, agitation, headaches. 
  • Persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to stop use of Adderall
  • Continued use of Adderall despite negative social, interpersonal, or legal consequences. 
  • Continued use despite negative physical or psychological effects caused by Adderall use
  • Adderall use is getting in the way of obligations such as family, work, or school. 
  • Use of Adderall in larger amounts or over a longer period of time than intended 
  • Using Adderall in physically hazardous situations 

What are the Signs of Adderall Abuse?

There are some symptoms that are very specific to Adderall abuse. The following symptoms can indicate possible Adderall abuse, especially if these symptoms are very uncharacteristic of the individual: 

  • Increase in energy that causes excessive talking, increase in social behavior, and feelings of grandiosity. 
  • Feeling very worried about possibly not having access to Adderall
  • “Doctor shopping,” or seeing many doctors with the goal of obtaining an ongoing prescription of Adderall or multiple prescriptions to support the built-up tolerance of Adderall. 
  • Increase in feelings of anxiety, worry, or panic 
  • Feeling hyperactive and an increase in goal-directed behavior. 
  • Uncontrollable shaking of a body part, such as the leg
  • Trouble falling or staying asleep 
  • Headache, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, diarrhea 
  • Weight loss 

Finding Adderall Addiction Treatment Centers

If you, a loved one, or someone you know is struggling with Adderall abuse or another addiction disorder, don’t hesitate to reach out for help as soon as possible. It is never too soon nor too late to seek help. Addiction treatment centers like Thrive Treatment can assist you in detoxing from Adderall or other drugs, find therapy options that best suit you, and develop skills to maintain long-term sobriety. Thrive Treatment has many options available for addiction treatment, such as partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, outpatient, and sober living home options. Our variety of options allows for us to help you build a personalized treatment plan based on your needs. Contact us today to schedule an assessment and start treatment today.

Is Addiction Passed Down Through Family?

Is Addiction Passed Down Through Family?

Addiction is a complicated disease that affects the individual that is addicted and their family members too. It strains relationships in the family and causes family members to be on edge and worry more about their loved one that is struggling with addiction.  

Is Addiction Genetic?

Many research studies have found that there is a genetic component to addiction. They have found that if a person in your family faces addiction, you are more likely to develop an addiction if you start using drugs. There is not a particular gene that causes addiction, but rather several have been identified as contributing to addiction. These studies have also determined that having these addiction risk genes does not guarantee that an individual will develop an addiction. Instead, it means that one is more vulnerable to developing an addiction when using a drug compared to others that do not have the gene. Genetics account for about 40-50% of their risk of developing an addiction.

The Role of Family Therapy in Addiction Treatment

Family therapy in addiction treatment seeks to address problematic family dynamics that contribute to continuing the cycle of addiction. The biggest goal of family therapy is prevention of ongoing addiction. It helps to stop family dynamics that also encourage enabling the addict and family dynamics that may contribute to other family members developing an addiction later. 

How to Talk to Your Family About Addiction

  • Approach them with a non-threatening attitude. People struggling with addiction frequently receive criticism for their drug use. Therefore, they are likely to become defensive when confronted about their use if it is addressed in a way that makes them feel attacked. Ensure that your tone, body language, and words are neutral. 
  • Validate their experience. Many people struggling with addiction either actively want to stop using or have tried to stop using in the past and have had difficulty stopping their use. They may feel a lot of guilt or shame for continuing to use, contributing to their instinct to become defensive when confronted. Before confronting them on their addiction, tell them you understand where they’re at right now. An example of how you can phrase this is, “I know you’ve been struggling for a long time and we’re here to support you.”
  • Prepare what you want to say to them ahead of time. You may have a lot of difficult feelings around your family member’s drug use, such as anger, resentment, sadness. These are all normal feelings, but you still need to be mindful about how you depict your feelings to them. Again, if they become defensive, they are more likely to check out and stop listening. Before beginning your conversation with them, take time to prepare what you want to say to them and how you want to say it so that it is neutral. 
  • Plan your talk with your family member at an appropriate time. Make sure that it is convenient for everyone involved in the conversation when you decide to talk to them so that the individual is more likely to listen. If they are worried about other things that they had planned for that time or vice versa, then they may be defensive from the start because their mind is preoccupied with other obligations that they are worried about.
  • Get other family members involved. Include other family members that may be strong support for the individual struggling with addiction. It’s crucial that they see that there are many people who care for them and wish the best for them to know that they are not alone while they are seeking recovery.

How to Find Family Therapy Treatment in Santa Monica, CA

Thrive Treatment offers comprehensive services to clients experiencing mental health or substance use concerns. We have expert clinicians available that provide case management services, individual therapy, group therapy, and family therapy. Each client has an individualized treatment plan that is unique to their recovery. We offer different levels of care, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, sober living houses, and aftercare. Contact us today to find out how we can help you through your recovery!

Signs Your Teen is Abusing Prescription Drugs

Signs Your Teen is Abusing Prescription Drugs

Thrive Treatment knows that drug use among teens has been on the rise for many years. One concerning fact is the heavy increase in prescription drug use rates among teens. According to the CDC, 14% of students reported misusing prescription opioids. They also found that in 2015, 27% of teens aged 12-19 had used one or more prescription drugs in the past 30 days. While using prescription drugs is not a disorder on its own, it can become harmful when the drugs are abused or misused. Abuse and misuse of prescription drugs mean taking them if they weren’t prescribed to you or taking them differently than prescribed, or to get high. 

Why Are Prescription Drugs Abused By Teens?

You may be wondering why your teen would start abusing prescription drugs. Here are some common reasons that teens start abusing them: 

  1. Poor mental health – Many teens turn to prescription use because of mental health concerns, such as depression or anxiety. They may not be receiving the mental health care they need or may struggle to escape their problems by turning to drug use. 
  2. Boredom – Teens who become bored are looking for something to do that may peak their interest. Because of ease of access and lack of knowledge of the side effects of prescription drugs, teens are likely to experiment with them if their time is not occupied with other activities. 
  3. Ease of access – Most teens who use prescription drugs get them free from a relative or friend. Other teens may buy them from a relative or friend, abuse them after getting them from a doctor, or get them from a drug dealer. 
  4. Lack of knowledge – Many teens will use prescription drugs with the misunderstanding that there are not any adverse side effects. They believe that because doctors prescribe it, it should be safe. However, prescriptions can have many long-term and short-term negative health side effects.
  5. Peer pressure – If teens have friends abusing prescription drugs, they are likely to be exposed to them. If your teen is easily influenced by peer pressure, they are more likely to use prescription drugs if their friends do. 
  6. Environment – Teens who have parents with drug use issues are also likely to abuse prescription drugs. They may be modeling parent behaviors

Signs of Prescription Drug Abuse in Teens

You can only know for certain if your teen is using drugs if they test positive on a drug screen or if you catch them in the act. You’re likely to notice other signs of drug use before these two, so it’s important to always be on the lookout for changes in behavior and appearance in your teen. Here are some signs to look out for

  • Frequently changing friends, especially when you don’t know the friends and disapprove of them. 
  • Decreased participation in activities that they used to enjoy or withdrawing from social circles. This can include quitting sports teams or clubs they used to enjoy, staying in their bedrooms more often, not talking to family members, not going out on outings with family members, and more. 
  • Breaking the rules, such as curfew, and coming up with fabricated explanations for this behavior. 
  • Unusual aggressive outbursts. It may feel like walking on eggshells around them because they are unusually irritable. 
  • Confronting them about possible substance use is met with an angry reaction. 
  • Their grades start to slip noticeably, and they start skipping class or entire schooldays. 
  • Mood swings
  • Bloodshot eyes, dilated pupils, or pinpoint pupils. 
  • A general lack of motivation affecting their school behavior, hygiene, and household chores. 
  • Uncharacteristic behavior, such as stealing, lying, or disrespect for authority figures.

Prescription Drug Abuse Treatment in Santa Monica, CA
If you suspect that your teen is struggling with addiction, don’t hesitate to reach out for help. It is never too soon nor too late to seek help for your teen. Having a professional objectively assess your teen’s needs is necessary to deem if they are struggling with addiction and what treatment options may best suit their needs. Thrive Treatment has many treatment options available, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, outpatient, and sober living homes. Contact us today to schedule an assessment for your teen!

What is Sober Living?

What is Sober Living?

It is estimated that 10% of Americans develop a substance use disorder, or addiction, at some point in their lives. Fortunately, many people are able to find recovery from their addiction if they receive the proper treatment. Proper treatment for substance use disorders often includes many types of treatment and levels of care. Many people start with inpatient or residential treatment and then move to outpatient treatment. For many people who move to outpatient treatment, sober living is an important part of their recovery journey because of the benefits of sober living programs. 

What is Sober Living?

Sober living homes are homes that individuals with addiction concerns can live at as they aim for long-term recovery. These homes are drug and alcohol-free environments that often have programs to promote healing. Characteristics common for most sober living environments include: 

  • The requirement to remain sober from all substances while living in the home 
  • Encouragement or requirement to attend 12-step self-help groups such as Narcotics Anonymous or Alcoholics Anonymous
  • The requirement to abide by all house rules with the penalty of being discharged from the home if rules are broken 
  • The responsibility for paying rent and other costs associated with living at the sober living home 
  • The ability to live at home for as long as the individual needs as long as they abide by all house rules

Why is Sober Living Important in the Recovery Process?

Sober living homes are often an important part of the recovery process because of how successful these programs have been. A study that observed data from sober living homes found that they have very high retention rates compared to other substance use treatment programs. People in these environments had an average length of stay between 166 and 254 days, which is much higher than the general bare minimum recommendation of 90 days. Additionally, individuals that included sober living environments in their recovery process noticed many improvements. Most residents were able to reduce or stop their use between baseline and the 6th follow-up and continue to maintain those improvements at additional follow-ups. They were able to maintain these improvements even after leaving the sober living home. They also noticed overall improvements in residents in terms of employment, psychiatric symptoms, and arrests. These homes were most likely successful for individuals who attended 12-step meetings regularly, had a drug and alcohol-free social network, and had low severity of mental health symptoms. 

Sober living homes are very helpful to individuals striving for long-term sobriety because they offer an alcohol and drug-free environment while also empowering individuals to become equipped with tools to use so that they cope with triggers in effective ways. It also helps individuals rebuild their lives in a safe environment so that they are more likely to build it without the presence of supports that promotes alcohol and drug use. 

How Do I Know if a Sober Living Home is Right for Me? 

Sober living environments are not required for everyone seeking long-term sobriety. However, many people find success when incorporating them into their recovery process. Here are some factors to consider that might make sober living a good option for you: 

  • Your current living environment keeps you exposed to alcohol or drug use.
  • Most or all of your social supports use alcohol or drugs.
  • Most of your recreational activities included alcohol or drug use before you decided to seek recovery. 
  • You need support managing triggers for relapse. 
  • You want to be surrounded by others who understand what you’re going through and who can support you through your recovery.
  • If you have a mental illness, the symptoms are managed mainly by coping skills, therapy, or medication and are generally low in severity.

How to find Sober Living in Santa Monica, CA

Thrive Treatment offers comprehensive services to clients experiencing mental health or substance use concerns. We have expert clinicians available that provide case management services, individual therapy, group therapy, and incorporation of family support. Each client has an individualized treatment plan unique to their recovery. We offer different levels of care, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, sober living houses, and aftercare. Contact us today to find out how we can help you through your recovery!

What is the Number One Drug Used by Teens?

What is the Number One Drug Used by Teens?

Teen drug use has been on the rise. This remains a concern because teens have been found to be more susceptible to developing an addiction. Researchers have found that the earlier people start to experiment and try drugs, the higher the chances of developing an addiction. Certain risk factors can raise the likelihood that teens will become addicted to drugs, such as poor supervision, familial conflict, family history of drug abuse, or a history of sexual or physical abuse. Therefore, parents and other caregivers need to remain educated about the common drugs used by teens and signs of teen drug use. 

What is the Number One Drug Used by Teens?

The most commonly used drug among teens can change from year to year. For example, it switched from alcohol in 2018 to any vaping in 2019. According to the Monitoring the Future survey from 2020, alcohol was the most popular drug used by teens. In 2020, 33.6% of 12th graders said that they had consumed alcohol in the past month. 

What are other drugs teens use? 

Each of the surveyed drugs had some amount of teens that had used it in the past month in 2020. However, most of these had very low percentages. Other drugs had much more significant rates of usage, including: 

  • Any vaping – 28.2% of 12th graders from the 2020 survey had used any vaping substance in the past month. 
  • Vaping nicotine – 24.7% of 12th graders from the 2020 survey had vaped nicotine in the past month.
  • Illicit drugs – 22.2% of 12th graders from the 2020 survey had used any illicit (i.e., illegal) substance in the past month. 
  • Marijuana – 21.2% of 12th graders from the 2020 survey had used marijuana in the past month. 

Signs Your Teen is Using Drugs 

You can only know for certain if your teen is using drugs if they test positive on a drug screen or if you catch them in the act. You’re likely to notice other signs of drug use before these two, so it’s important to always be on the lookout for changes in behavior and appearance in your teen. Here are some signs to look out for

  • Frequently changing friends, especially when you don’t know the friends and disapprove of them. 
  • Decreased participating in activities that they used to enjoy or withdrawing from others. This can include quitting sports teams or clubs they used to enjoy, staying in their bedrooms more often, not talking to family members, not going out on outings with family members, and more. 
  • Breaking the rules, such as curfew, and coming up with fabricated explanations for this behavior. 
  • Unusual aggressive outbursts. It may feel like walking on eggshells around them because they are unusually irritable. 
  • Confronting them about possible substance use is met with an angry reaction. 
  • Their grades start to slip noticeably, and they start skipping class or entire schooldays. 
  • Mood swings
  • Bloodshot eyes, dilated pupils, or pinpoint pupils. 
  • A general lack of motivation affecting their school behavior, hygiene, and household chores. 
  • Uncharacteristic behavior, such as stealing, lying, or disrespect for authority figures. 

How to Get Your Teen Help with Addiction Today

If you suspect that your teen is struggling with addiction, don’t hesitate to reach out for help. It is never too soon nor too late to seek help for your teen. Having a professional objectively assess your teen’s needs is necessary to deem if they are struggling with addiction and what treatment options may best suit their needs. Thrive Treatment has many treatment options available, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, outpatient, and sober living homesContact us today to schedule an assessment for your teen!

The Warning Signs of Bulimia and Anorexia

The Warning Signs of Bulimia and Anorexia

Eating disorders, such as bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa, are commonly researched in females. Portrayals of eating disorders in media and television are also overwhelmingly female. However, eating disorders, much like other mental health issues, do not discriminate gender or nationality. Bulimia and anorexia are found to occur in both males and females and in different countries worldwide. Bulimia affects 3% of females and more than 1% of males. anorexia affects up to 4% of females and 0.3% of males. Recognizing the signs of bulimia and anorexia is imperative because the risk of death in individuals is five times higher for those with eating disorders than those without. 

What is bulimia? 

According to the DSM-5, bulimia nervosa is characterized by the following five diagnostic criteria:

  • Recurrent episodes of binge eating that includes consuming larger amounts of food than the average person within a two-hour window and feeling like one cannot stop eating. 
  • Recurrent compensatory behaviors that one does to prevent weight gain. Examples include self-induced vomiting, fasting or excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or other medications. 
  • The pattern of binge eating and compensatory behavior occurs about once a week for at least three months. 
  • The individual evaluates themselves solely based on their body shape and weight. 
  • These symptoms do not occur exclusively during episodes of anorexia nervosa. 

A common myth of eating disorders is that they do not occur in individuals who are at a “normal body weight.” However, as indicated above, the criteria do not specify body weight. The disorder is a psychological disturbance that manifests in behavioral changes to compensate, resulting in adverse health effects. 

What is anorexia? 

According to the DSM-5, anorexia nervosa is characterized by the following three diagnostic criteria:

  • Restriction of food intake is lower than the recommended daily intake for the individual, which ultimately leads to significantly low body weight compared to what is considered healthy for their age, sex, and development. 
  • A feeling of persistent, intense fear of gaining weight and behavior to avoid weight gain. 
  • One’s self-worth is almost entirely influenced by body weight or shape, feeling disturbed by one’s own body weight or shape, or lacking recognition of low body weight.

The presence of anorexia nervosa can occur as either restricting type or binge-eating/purging type. The restricting type occurs without the presence of binge eating or purging. The binge-eating/purging type occurs with the presence of binge eating episodes or purging behavior within the anorexia nervosa episode. 

What are the signs of bulimia and anorexia? 

There are many medical complications of both bulimia and anorexia that can often be observed by visual symptoms. The following include behavioral clues and signs of medical complications related to bulimia and anorexia: 

  • Dry Skin 
  • Feeling cold all the time and thus wearing extra layers of clothing
  • Wearing baggy clothes to hide the weight loss 
  • Constipation and bloating
  • Irregular period or loss of period
  • Hair loss and brittle nails
  • Presence of soft, fine hairs on the body, known as lanugo hair
  • Obsession with food, including calorie counting and categorizing foods as good or bad
  • Obsession with one’s weight or body shape, which can manifest as constantly checking oneself in the mirror or weighing oneself
  • Excessive exercise 
  • Excessive fasting periods or extreme dieting
  • Feeling tired all the time
  • Increased irritability 
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Hiding food to make it look like they ate or avoiding mealtimes

How Thrive Treatment Can Help

The best treatment for bulimia and anorexia is a combination of medication, such as antidepressants and psychotherapy. Thrive Treatment can help you or your loved one create a personalized treatment plan to address bulimia and anorexia. This can include individual therapy, group therapy, mindfulness, meditation techniques, and medication. We believe in treating each client as an individual, so our expert clinicians will ensure that they utilize an approach that best fits your needs. Reach out today to find out how Thrive Treatment can help you achieve recovery.

How Social Media Affects Teens Body Image

how social media affects teens body image

Being a teenager is notoriously difficult, especially today. Teenagers are in the midst of vast changes, both physically and mentally, are developing rapidly during those years. Because of this, they are also susceptible at this age. External influences and factors can cause a variety of mental health issues if not handled properly.

What is Body Image? 

Body image is a general term for how we see ourselves in regards to features like weight, height, skin tone, build, facial features, and more. People can get ideas of what a body should look like from their peers or outside media, such as magazines, television, and social media. People who don’t internalize these outside messages of body image tend to have a more positive body image of themselves. However, people who do internalize those messages of what their body “should” look like tend to have a more negative body image

How Social Media Affects Body Image

Social media does not cause a negative body image in and of itself. For example, people who use social media to consume content exclusively from family members don’t seem to have an altered body image. However, if your teen is consuming certain content, they may be at risk of negative body image. Social media can increase the risk for negative body image in the following ways: 

  • Influencers: Influencers are people hand-picked by companies to market their products or messages. Oftentimes, influencers are attractive, and thus pick up a large following. Teens are very likely to engage in content created by influencers. Unfortunately, people who consume content from attractive peers are found to have higher rates of negative body image. 
  • Thin-ideal: Messages that promote and portray the thin-ideal are also associated with developing negative body image because it promotes unrealistic expectations. On the other hand, those who consume content more related to health and fitness on social media tend to have more positive body image as these results are more realistic and attainable. 
  • Photo alterations: Photo alterations through filters, photo editing apps, and photoshop tend to continue to permeate the thin-ideal message and make it much easier for individuals to alter their appearance to be more attractive. This makes it even more common for teens to come into contact with social media content that is likely to negatively impact their body image. 

Body Image and Mental Health

Being aware of the way in which social media affects teens’ body image is imperative. Social media is more accessible than ever and has been found to be associated with negative body image. Negative body image has been associated with a higher risk of developing mental health conditions, such as depression and eating disorders. 

Depression is a serious issue for many teenagers but becomes more common every year. Read more here on signs your teenager is depressed and what to do if they are depressed. 

Unsure of how to talk with your teen about their social media use? Learn more here

How Thrive Treatment Can Help

Thrive Treatment offers comprehensive services to clients experiencing mental health or substance use concerns. We have expert clinicians available that provide case management services, individual therapy, group therapy, and incorporation of family support. Each client has an individualized treatment plan unique to their recovery. We offer different levels of care, including partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, sober living houses, and aftercare. Contact us today to find out how we can help you through your recovery!